The Balmy Palmy house in Sydney, where instead of part of the walls and floor there is a grid

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The CplusC architects have created the perfect place for a family with three teenagers, where all the family can retire and admire the trees, the sky and the ocean growing around through the grid

p>Balmy House Palmy in Sydney, where instead of part of the walls and floor there is a grid

In their Balmy Palmy House project, CplusC architects sing of a leisurely life in nature and invite you to enjoy peace under the canopy of trees. And, sometimes, in the truest sense of the word: part of the walls here is a grid. The house is located in the Sydney area of ​​Palm Beach and stands on a rocky shore, its task is to create for the owners all the conditions for outdoor recreation, where they could recuperate and “recharge” under the rustle of leaves and the singing of birds, escaping from the hustle and bustle metropolis.

Balmy Palmy's house in Sydney with a grid instead of some walls and floorBalmy Palmy's home in Sydney, where instead of part of the walls and floor - a grid

The house was built for a family with three teenage children. The customers wanted to keep dense thickets of trees and bushes on their site in order to enjoy nature right from the terrace. They imagined a modest, compact building that would merge with the surrounding landscape. The budget was tight enough that the design had to be quick and easy to assemble to keep oversight and labor costs to a minimum. “/>The Balmy Palmy house in Sydney, where part of the walls and floor are mesh

On a steep slope overgrown with shrubs, the lack of stable ground created a risk of landslide. The architects needed to consider the design of the foundation and supports in order to interfere with the landscape as little as possible and not cause damage to mature trees, in particular – the imposing Saligna acacia, which is under the protection of the local council.

“In picturesque places like this, the temptation is to make a big house to enjoy the views, which often requires cutting down trees, removing excess soil and rocks, and building extensive retaining walls. We wanted the house to be modest and receptive to the environment,” says lead architect Clinton Cole.

The Balmy Palmy house in Sydney, where part of the walls and floor is a grid

Because the site did not have stable soil, concrete supports were driven into the ground, creating a minimal foundation for a one-story house. The light superstructure is made of steel and prefabricated wooden elements. A bright yellow spiral staircase leads to the terrace of the house of wills on its western facade.

Balmy Palmy's home in Sydney with mesh instead of some walls and floorBalmy Palmy's home in Sydney with a grid instead of some walls and floorBalmy Palmy's home in Sydney, where instead of part of the walls and floor - a grid

The western terrace, enclosed by mesh and lattice panels, faces the slope and the ocean. It has seating areas and a mesh hammock flooring – right at the tops of the trees. Sliding glass doors along the entire west front allow owners to easily access the terrace from the dining room, living room and two bedrooms.

 The Balmy Palmy house in Sydney, where instead of part of the walls and floor there is a meshBalmy Palmy's home in Sydney with mesh instead of some walls and floorBalmy Palmy house in Sydney with mesh instead of walls and floor

Home owner “728” height=”485″ class=”lazy-image__image _align-center” data-v-64ca9b5a=”1″ alt=”Balmy Palmy house in Sydney with mesh instead of some walls and floor” />Balmy Palmy's home in Sydney with mesh instead of some walls and floor

The terrace, partially sheltered from the sun and rain by a roof, is used as an open corridor connecting the spaces of the house. “Thanks to the absence of “closed” corridors, you find yourself in nature when you leave the room. The treetops all around, the chirping of the birds, the roar of the ocean —lounging on the terrace is like being in a treehouse,” says Clinton Cole.

Balmy Palmy's home in Sydney with mesh instead of some walls and floorBalmy Palmy's home in Sydney with mesh instead of some walls and floor

By making the house from prefabricated elements, the architects made it easier to transport materials, reducing construction time and waste. This became part of an eco-strategy to reduce the house's environmental impact. For example, a building is planned to optimize the amount of sunlight that enters the rooms during the day and at different times of the year. Large sliding doors and louvres provide cross ventilation. Four Haiku ceiling fans reduce the need for air conditioning, while recycled rainwater is used in the bathrooms and irrigation systems on site.Balmy Palmy's home in Sydney with a mesh instead of walls and floor+2

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